Senior Artists put on a ‘Big Show’

Senior Timm Hoff’s The Post-It Man; Mixed Media piece; would like to tell you about the way it’s disappearing in Memorial Hall. — Photo by Kinley Q. Nichols

Senior Timm Hoff’s The Post-It Man; Mixed Media piece; would like to tell you about the way it’s disappearing in Memorial Hall. — Photo by Kinley Q. Nichols

There are only six days left to see the CSC art student’s culminate works, on display in Memorial Hall’s Main Gallery. On April 6 the art will be packed up, and the graduating seniors will set their gaze on new heights. Nine senior’s art is on display, each one bringing a unique flair to the artistic smorgasbord.

Featured Artists:

Morgan Allberry 

Allberry, a self-professed graphic designer, said she draws inspiration from her mother, a fellow artist.

As futures go, Allberry wants to work, in her words, in a “big city, for a big company.”

Animation, one of Allberry’s passions, is also on her career radar. Allberry said “I would love to work for Pixar, Disney, or Blue Sky.” This aspiration is quite a tall one. It would have been interesting to see Allberry’s animation work in the Senior Art Show.

Her featured works include “Lake Maloney”, a placid photograph, and “Live, Laugh, Love”, an inspiring and precise stained glass. Allberry’s work is charismatic and calm, and her pieces reflect a thoughtful mind.

Kelsey Bogus

In her artist’s statement, Bogus said, “my greatest joy comes from creating art that mimics the beauty of nature and the beauty of life.”

This motto is reflected perfectly in her piece, “Wonder of Life”. This black and white linocut portrays a child, enveloped in the swirling tendrils of the cosmos. This piece embodies Bogus’ statement, while exhibiting her artistic forte.

Bogus’ other strength is her small stoneware. Her piece “Maple Syrup Bottle” has an attractive rendering of Canada’s leaf, while the piece “In a Slump” embodied my old art teacher’s mantra, “when a pot doesn’t turn out right, it can still make great art.”

Senior artist Jean Dobias’ painting  “This life is a strange beautiful place of inexplicable friendship and paradise and magic” is on display in the Senior Art Show.  — Photo by Kinley Q. Nichols

Senior artist Jean Dobias’ painting “This life is a strange beautiful place of inexplicable friendship and paradise and magic” is on display in the Senior Art Show. — Photo by Kinley Q. Nichols

Jean Dobias

For a unique change, this artist penned her statement into a poem. One portion in particular stood out.

“I believe in art, which is the ultimate, timeless act of creating all things worth believing in.” Dobais wrote.

To be brief, Dobais does art large. She’s a worker of long, enigmatic titles and intriguing work. One acrylic referenced the BBC program Sherlock, in which the title character’s arch nemesis Moriarty says, “in the world of locked doors, the man with the key is king, and you should see me in a crown.”  Another piece, by far the largest in the exhibit hall, is a giant fabric woman. Her cloth hair tickles the ceiling, and the woman’s body is swathed in floral patterns and spring swatches. Dobais’ work impresses the viewer with power and color, which is an artistic virtue.

Timm Hoff

“Art tells stories” Hoff stated in his written message, “we are made to create.” IN another section he wrote, “Everyone is telling their story… but not everyone is sharing it… an artist is.”

Like his statement, Hoff created very quixotic works. Especially enchanting is his hand-shaped steel and copper pieces. Their kinetic feel harkens to coral reefs and oceanic grasses. Hoff’s paramount work is the “Lisa’s Wall” and “Post-it Man” exhibit, where a drywall section supports two 3-D displays. According to Hoff, both these works “deal with magic, wonder, loss, and the joy of life.” I found that Hoff’s pieces reflected a fascinating reaction to life, and certainly shared a story with the audience.

Joshua Hoffman

“Not all people can relate to my perspective of the world.” Hoffman said in his statement. “Although I understand what I am creating, I cannot define what the viewer is going to take away from it.”

Hoffman presents work as circumspect as his words. Hoffman’s subtle oil, “10:37pm” does exactly what the title implies. The seeping light and under-toned subject matter captures a moment in time with aching calmness. Hoffman’s work stirs emotions, and it left me wanting more. For only showing two displays, Hoffman’s pieces encourage one to stand, head cocked to one side, and stare.

Daniel King

This artist claimed “The unexpected is for me.” Keeping with his ideals, I certainly did not expect King’s pieces. The most oracular article is his “Alien Warriors.” These clay tiles depict aztec-worthy carvings, reminiscent of Meso-American styles.

Also, King presents some nice logo work with his hypothetical shop, “King’s comics.”

Marty Lastovica

“I’ve always been a fan of art that has a purpose or a strong message conveyed.”Lastovica said in his creative statement.

My favorite piece of Lastovica’s, “Votes and Rifles”, completely fulfills the artist’s aim of propagating messages. Theodore Roosevelt’s trademark smile glows beside his own words, “A vote is like a rifle; its usefulness depends on the character of the user.” Below this conviction, a line of rifle shells point upwards, their bullets replaced with pencil tips.

Lastovica’s other contribution is a bevy of functional works that showcase his campus involvement. These include two event posters, the Art Day t-shirt, and his self-produced CD. Lastovica featured many works, which reflect his thoughtful, useful style.

Kathy Underwood

Underwood is inspired by her family, especially her son and his “carefree way of life.” According to Underwood, “Art keeps me alive.”

Although her current favorite medium is pottery – in her words, “It’s challenging, and I want to conquer it.” –  Underwood glows in stained glass.

“Agate Sunrise”, a stained glass piece, is an impressive array of colors, set off by agate slices, and constructed into a beautiful lamp. Another glass, “Spring Sunrise”, depicts a duck in deep, aqueous colors. Finally, her tertiary piece, “Scorpios Life”, balances warm colors with clouded astrological signs. Her works are very attractive renderings.

Tiffany Wiley

This artist hopes to teach High School art in a rural setting.

Wiley’s oils are her trademark, she said oils are her “absolute favorite.” Her two paintings, both bright  pictures of girls, look like treasured Polaroids a grandparent might keep by their bed. Besides painting, Wiley is displaying an low table that she formed into an impressive tiger-lily mosaic.

Wiley’s favorite genres span realism, impressionism, and post-modernism.

“I am very structured and controlled.” She said. In the future, Wiley said she hopes to be more “free” in her work.

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