Rugby: a team sport for anyone

With a genuine smile and energetic personality, Allyn Lieck, 20, sophomore of Broken Bow, started to describe how her interests in football, though she was not able to play in her earlier years, eventually led her to join CSC’s rugby team. Though she did not join the team her first year at CSC, now in her second year she is part of the team along with approximately 15 other girls who practice and play.

“It’s kind of a difficult question,” Lieck said when asked what one word she would use to describe rugby. “To explain rugby in one word is rugby.”

“There’s not really anything else like it ‘cause when you play rugby, you’re out on the field and running as fast as you can and hitting as hard as you can.”

Stephanie Eggleston, 21, junior Communications major, of North Platte, jogs across the CSC practice field Thursday during Women’s rugby practice. — Photo by T.J. Thomson

Stephanie Eggleston, 21, junior Communications major, of North Platte, jogs across the CSC practice field Thursday during Women’s rugby practice. — Photo by T.J. Thomson

“You’re out there to win,” she said. “It’s not us versus them, it’s not us and them as teams, there’s rugby players and non rugby players.”

It’s difficult not to get hurt in rugby when you’re falling to the ground and getting dog piled for a large, football shaped ball. According to Lieck, this makes it challenging for recruiting new members of the girls’ rugby club, because it seems to be a genuine consensus among girls on campus that getting hit is bad. “It’s really difficult; I’m not going to lie,” she said. Around campus, the team advertises the fun parts of rugby in order to attract new members, but getting hurt is part of the game. “Yes, we run and get knocked down, but it’s fun.” Lieck said. “Besides, bruises are temporary and blood makes the grass grow.”

As part of the team, members are given the chance to play against multiple colleges and meet a lot of other people. “It’s a great team,” Lieck said. With no coach because the team is a club rather than college sponsored activity, the club members manage everything themselves. However, they often work with the Wayne State team and their coach.  “Having a coach would be nice but all things considered, we do pretty well,” Lieck said.

“[This is the] best team experience I could ever hope for,” Lieck said, grinning.

Comments

Comments are closed.

Recent Lifestyles Articles

Student attendance down for Toga party

Apr. 28, 2016

With school coming to a close and students stressed out about their upcoming finals, Late Night at The Pit put on a toga party.


The Big Event shows students’ support of community

Apr. 28, 2016

The day was warm and sunny at most times, when Chadron State students and faculty set out to make a difference in the Chadron community Saturday. While some volunteers worked at one job site, others were able to finish jobs in good time and move on to help with other projects. This was the case with the volunteers that helped hang the net batting cage at Chadron’s baseball fields, located just off Main Street.


1st Step to History

Apr. 28, 2016

The Dawes County Travel Board awards $50k grant to Game and Parks Commission for Cowboy Trail project; The fourth annual The Big Event volunteers helps clean up the Cowboy Trail, Saturday, which when finished will be the longest rail-to-trail conversion in the United States


Making Earth pretty

Apr. 28, 2016

Earth Day and Chadron’s annual The Big Event came in conjunction this weekend for a service day with twice the purpose.


The Big Event returns for year No. 4

Apr. 28, 2016

Chadron State College hosted its fourth annual The Big Event Saturday to once again say thank you to the Chadron community.