Infinite possibilities decorate art gallery

Gallery 239, tucked away n the second floor or Memorial Hall, has seen a lot of art. Through its doors pass professional works and student pieces, strange modern expressions and traditional oils. Now, wrapping up its year of shows, Gallery 239 holds an eclectic collection of advanced art student’s works. Seven artists; Rod Clause, Megan Gibbons, Brittney DeBord, Chris Green, Timm Hoff, Shelley McCafferty, and Macee Kellner, are displaying their works from now until the end of the year.

“Untitled,” by Shelley McCafferty,  sits in the upstairs gallery of Memorial Hall. — Photos by Ashley Swanson

“Untitled,” by Shelley McCafferty, sits in the upstairs gallery of Memorial Hall. — Photos by Ashley Swanson

The pieces are varied in composition, but carry a common theme. A batik-dyed fabric, by Clause, guides the eye up its colorful converging lines, into a distant point. Six ceramic mugs, by DeBord, stand empty on a pedestal, waiting to be filled. Three charcoal hands, by Gibbons, hang on the wall, each detailing an aspect of anatomy: Skin, muscle, and bone. All of these seemingly unrelated pieces culminate to provide a over-riding sense to the show. It speaks of the possible: what can be achieved by those hands, what could fill the mugs, and where the converging lines lead.

“Bruno’s Brother Ted,” by Rod Clause features a ceramics version of a man’s face.

“Bruno’s Brother Ted,” by Rod Clause features a ceramics version of a man’s face.

All the pieces, whether it’s Green’s brightly- colored digital photographs or Hoff’s tribal-dream intaglio print, imply a wealth of possibilities. The possibility of love, of discovery, of death. One of Clause’s pieces, a ceramic man, haggard and pieced together like Frankenstein’s monster, implies the universal possibility of decay. McCafferty’s three glass bowls, showing off the artist’s eye for clean, modern lines, espouse the possibility of youth and wealth within their neatly-made brims. Kellner provided the most literal example of this theme, choosing to exhibit her re-purposed flute-key jewelry and recycled lace choker. Kellner’s other pieces, two poster designs, encapsulate the show. They read, “infinite possibilities,” with a recycling symbol above. Kellner’s design twists the symbol into a lemniscate, the mathematical symbol for infinity.

The Gallery 239 show represents a wide array of possibilities, an infinite one, in fact. The artists revived old materials for their pieces, like Clause’s welded instrument helmet, “Weldabone.” They created pieces that imply something yet to come, like the coy smile of the Green’s photographic model. They created new mediums, like the hand-made paper in Clause’s “Book of Secrets.” They, together, exhibit the potential of a creative group of senior artists, and how the talent of CSC’s art department has infinite possibilities.

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