Star-filled show dazzles students

Caelum Hubl, freshman of Lincoln, uses a laser to point out constellations during his presentation. This image shows "star trailing," which is catching the movement of the stars, Friday, in the planetarium in the Math and Science building. —Photo by Sara Tweet

Caelum Hubl, freshman of Lincoln, uses a laser to point out constellations during his presentation. This image shows “star trailing,” which is catching the movement of the stars, Friday, in the planetarium in the Math and Science building. —Photo by Sara Tweet

CSC Geoscience student Caelum Hubl, freshman of Lincoln, dazzled a small crowd at 2 p.m. Friday, during a scheduled showing of the winter constellations at CSC’s planetarium in the Math and Science building.

Hubl kept the crowd interested by speaking about certain constellations that can be seen during the winter months as a main focus, and then touched on some of the other season’s more prominent constellations.

The Milky Way Galaxy is shown during the Planetarium Show on Friday in the Math and Science building.— Photo by Sara Tweet

The Milky Way Galaxy is shown during the Planetarium Show on Friday in the Math and Science building.— Photo by Sara Tweet

Hubl began his presentation with the story of Orion and Taurus, two constellations that can be seen easily this time of year. He spoke a bit about The Seven Sisters constellation and moved on to show the crowd the Milky Way Galaxy, which looked like a light gray belt stretching across the night sky.

During his presentation, Hubl also taught students and community members in attendance how to find The North Star, The Big Dipper, and The Little Dipper using stars in other constellations. Hubl’s knowledge of each constellation helped audience members learn more about the story and placement of each one he showed.

“You can create a story for basically any star you want,” Hubl said. “You can create a constellation in any way you want.”

Hubl said that many people choose to create their own constellations, or pictures in the sky just because they think a certain star grouping looks a specific way.

The showings are from 2-3 p.m. every Friday and are free and open to the public. The topic of the showing changes each week, but always teaches viewers more about the night sky. The planetarium is staffed by students and the shows each Friday are also presented by students in the Geoscience Department at CSC.

You may also like...

%d bloggers like this: